School Funding

It's Time for a New Maryland Promise

Educators and legislators are working together to pave the way for the next era in public education funding. A 2016 study presented to the Kirwan Commission, a group of 25 education leaders tasked with revising the state’s funding formula, found that Maryland public schools are annually underfunded by $2.9 billion. That’s an average of $2 million in underfunding in each and every school in Maryland.

Our schools need adequate and equitable funding to again be the center of our communities and foundation of our state's success. It’s time to for a new Maryland Promise to every family in the state that all of our children, no matter their neighborhood, have a great public school and an equal opportunity for success. As the Kirwan Commission and General Assembly revise Maryland’s school funding formula for the first time in nearly two decades, we have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to revamp and improve how Maryland funds our schools.

The percentage of Maryland public school students living in poverty has more than doubled since 1990—from 22% to 45%—putting our statewide student population on the verge of becoming majority low-income. Since the last time the state funding formula was revised nearly 20 years ago, the percentage of English language learners, who require more staff and resources to catch up and stay on track with their English-speaking peers, has doubled. The number of students receiving special education services has also increased markedly. Maryland now ranks near the bottom of all states for funding poor districts and affluent district evenly, with federal education data showing that Maryland’s poorest school districts receive 5% less state and local education funding than Maryland’s wealthiest districts.

This underfunding has resulted in an increasing teacher to student ratio, meaning larger class sizes and less individualized instruction. Maryland teachers make 84 cents on the dollar compared to peers in similar fields with similar levels of education. Far too many support staff don’t make a living wage and must work multiple jobs to make ends meet. A statewide survey of educators in 2018 found that 41% of educators work a second job to make ends meet, 91% buy school supplies for their students out of their own pockets, and nearly 70% believe that their schools do not have enough staffing or funding to help students be successful. 

Marylanders overwhelmingly want to close the funding gap in the state. A November 2017 poll found that 72% of Marylanders said they favor “fill[ing] the multi-billion dollar funding gap that public schools in Maryland are currently facing.” Only 21% oppose it. The Kirwan Commission will deliver its final recommendations in late 2018 and the General Assembly will consider those recommendations, along with a new funding formula, during the 2019 legislative session. MSEA will be at the forefront of fighting for a significant increase in the resources and opportunities available to every student in Maryland.

For the latest news on the Kirwan Commission and school funding in Maryland, visit MSEA Newsfeed.

Voters Overwhelmingly Pass Question 1 to Fix the Fund

When Marylanders approved casino gaming, voters thought the new revenue would increase education funding. But instead, Gov. O'Malley used $500 million of that money elsewhere in his budgets, followed by Gov. Hogan diverting $1.4 billion of casino money to plug holes in other parts of his budgets. In 2018, educators successfully fought for the passage of the Fix the Fund Act, which put a constitutional amendment on the November ballot (Question 1) to finally stop this budget gimmick and provide a $500 million annual increase in school funding. Question 1 passed overwhelmingly, with more votes than anything else on the ballot and by the widest margin of any Maryland ballot measure in more than 20 years. It's clear that Marylanders want increased funding for public schools, and Question 1 was the first step in making that a reality.

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MSEA Statement on Hogan’s Newest Attacks on Public Schools

"Under the Hogan Administration, our public schools have been underfunded by $3 billion every single year—that means the average school in our state is underfunded by $2 million. This underfunding has led to larger class sizes and cuts to student programs. The governor should stop attacking our public schools and start rolling up his sleeves with the rest of the state’s leaders to reverse this shameful underfunding and make sure the Kirwan Commission’s recommendations become law.”

PARCC Scores Show Schools Are Underfunded

“This year’s PARCC scores are a reflection of the fact that our schools are underfunded. When you have class sizes of more than 30 kids to a teacher, when you have high teacher turnover rates because we underpay educators, and when you don’t address the non-academic barriers to learning in our communities of high poverty, you see achievement gaps persist. It’s not enough to talk about test scores—kids are never going to test their way out of poverty. We need more funding in our public schools to meet the needs of every child, and until then you’re going to keep seeing the same results," said MSEA President Betty Weller.

Sen. Madaleno, ACLU of Maryland, and Educators Call on Gov. Hogan to Withhold Funding for Private Schools

Earlier this week, the governor claimed the state is facing declining revenues in deciding to withhold $25 million that had been set aside for public schools, yet did not decide to hold back funding reserved for private schools. Sen. Madaleno, ACLU, and MSEA asked the governor to instead send the $5 million in taxpayer dollars to public schools to offset some of the damage from the cuts Gov. Hogan made earlier this week.

MSEA Statement on Gov. Hogan’s Political Decision to Withhold School Funding (Again)

Gov. Hogan’s office announced he would be withholding approximately $80 million included in the General Assembly’s bipartisan FY2017 budget—including $25 million for public schools. This is the second consecutive year that Gov. Hogan has made the unilateral decision to withhold funding from schools.

MSEA Launches Video and Digital Ad Campaign to Call on Gov. Hogan to Release School Funding

MSEA launches a new video and digital advertising campaign asking Marylanders to urge Gov. Hogan to release $68 million in education funding included in the General Assembly’s passed budget. A broad, bipartisan coalition of educators, parents, school board members, superintendents, county officials, and state legislators have been holding local events since the end of the legislative session to urge Gov. Hogan to release this funding for our schools

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