School Funding

It's Time for a New Maryland Promise

Educators and legislators are working together to pave the way for the next era in public education funding. A 2016 study presented to the Kirwan Commission, a group of 25 education leaders tasked with revising the state’s funding formula, found that Maryland public schools are annually underfunded by $2.9 billion. That’s an average of $2 million in underfunding in each and every school in Maryland.

Our schools need adequate and equitable funding to again be the center of our communities and foundation of our state's success. It’s time to for a new Maryland Promise to every family in the state that all of our children, no matter their neighborhood, have a great public school and an equal opportunity for success. As the Kirwan Commission and General Assembly revise Maryland’s school funding formula for the first time in nearly two decades, we have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to revamp and improve how Maryland funds our schools.

The percentage of Maryland public school students living in poverty has more than doubled since 1990—from 22% to 45%—putting our statewide student population on the verge of becoming majority low-income. Since the last time the state funding formula was revised nearly 20 years ago, the percentage of English language learners, who require more staff and resources to catch up and stay on track with their English-speaking peers, has doubled. The number of students receiving special education services has also increased markedly. Maryland now ranks near the bottom of all states for funding poor districts and affluent district evenly, with federal education data showing that Maryland’s poorest school districts receive 5% less state and local education funding than Maryland’s wealthiest districts.

This underfunding has resulted in an increasing teacher to student ratio, meaning larger class sizes and less individualized instruction. Maryland teachers make 84 cents on the dollar compared to peers in similar fields with similar levels of education. Far too many support staff don’t make a living wage and must work multiple jobs to make ends meet. And this underfunding has a direct, negative impact on the breadth and depth of programs available to students. 

Marylanders overwhelmingly want to close the funding gap in the state. A November 2017 poll found that 72% of Marylanders said they favor “fill[ing] the multi-billion dollar funding gap that public schools in Maryland are currently facing.” Only 21% oppose it. The Kirwan Commission will deliver its final recommendations in mid-2018 and the General Assembly will consider those recommendations, along with a new funding formula, during the 2019 legislative session. MSEA will be at the forefront of fighting for a significant increase in the resources and opportunities available to every student in Maryland.

For the latest news on the Kirwan Commission and school funding in Maryland, visit MSEA Newsfeed.

Fix the Fund—Vote Yes on Question 1

When Marylanders approved casino gaming, voters thought the new revenue would increase education funding. But instead, Gov. O'Malley used $500 million of that money elsewhere in his budgets, followed by Gov. Hogan diverting $1.4 billion of casino money to plug holes in other parts of his budgets. In 2018, educators successfully fought for the passage of the Fix the Fund Act, which puts a constitutional amendment on the ballot in November (Question 1) to finally stop this budget gimmick and provide a $500 million annual increase in school funding. If voters approve the amendment, it will be an important first step in closing the annual $2.9 billion underfunding of our schools. To learn more about the importance of voting yes on Question 1 to Fix the Fund and ensure that casino revenues go to increasing public school funding, visit VoteYesOnOne.org

Gov. Hogan's Anti-Public Education Record

Since becoming Maryland’s governor, Hogan has made several attempts to cut public education funding. By cutting the Geographic Cost of Education Index (GCEI) in half and capping the inflation factor in the Thornton formula, his first budget proposal in 2015 would have cut hundreds of millions of dollars from public schools during his term in office if it had been passed. Parents, educators, students, and school officials worked with a bipartisan group of legislators in Annapolis to reverse those cuts—including a unanimous vote on an amended budget restoring education funding in the Senate. In order to get Gov. Hogan to allocate the full funding for education set aside in this budget, the General Assembly passed legislation that would make GCEI mandatory in future years should the governor withhold the $68 million dedicated for schools.

Despite that, Gov. Hogan still withheld the $68 million for public schools. Determined not to back down in a political standoff with the General Assembly, the governor announced in a May 2015 press conference that he would not be releasing the funding allocated by the legislature. As a result, Maryland students and teachers had to make due with less—including increased teacher turnover in Carroll, larger class sizes in Howard, 400 fewer educators in Montgomery, and cut programs in Frederick.

Unfortunately, he has continued to attempt to cut education funding. In 2016, he withheld more than $20 million that the General Assembly had allocated for education funding. And in 2017, Gov. Hogan cut $20 million from after-school and summer programs, college readiness scholarships, and programs to increase teacher retention and decrease turnover. Given his record, it's no surprise that the governor has tried to distract Marylanders from the $2.9 billion in annual school underfunding during his watch.

 

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Poll: Maryland Educators Facing Financial Strains

“Far too many educators are struggling to make ends meet. It’s clear that Maryland needs to do more for our teachers and school staff. Educators devote their lives to making a difference for every single child in their community, yet as a state we have allowed educators to become undervalued. The Kirwan Commission, legislators, and local officials must address this problem head-on so we can recruit and retain the talented and dedicated educators our kids need and deserve," said Baltimore County elementary teacher and MSEA President Cheryl Bost.

MSEA Statement on Fix the Fund Act Passage

“We applaud the General Assembly for taking the first step in making a new Maryland Promise to every family, in every community, that the state will fund a strong public school for their children. We now turn our focus to ensuring bold recommendation from the Kirwan Commission, a YES vote on the Fix the Fund ballot question in November, and the passage of a new school funding formula in the 2019 General Assembly session that comprehensively addresses our annual funding shortage," said MSEA President Betty Weller.

Goucher Poll: Maryland Underfunds Public Education, Say 71% of Residents

“Parents and educators know the truth about how underfunded our schools have become in the last decade. The time for budget gimmicks and temporary fixes must end. The 2018 elections will be a referendum on the question of: who is ready to pass a comprehensive plan to provide our schools and students with the funding they truly need?”

MSEA Calls for $364 Million Supplemental Budget for Schools

"It took four legislative sessions, but today the governor finally admitted that our public schools have billions of dollars in unmet needs. The truth is, Gov. Hogan has used the Education Trust Fund shell game gimmick to shift $1.4 billion away from education during his time in office. There’s some real hypocrisy in proposing legislation to make you do something you’ve refused to do on your own. If the governor really thinks this promise should no longer be broken—as he’s done four times—then he should send down a supplemental budget this year for public school funding that equals the difference between the increase in education funding ($139 million) and the amount of revenue raised into the Education Trust Fund ($503 million). That comes out to $364 million.”

Hogan Proposes $88.9 Million in Cuts to School Programs

“Another year, another Gov. Hogan budget that follows the policy priorities of Betsy DeVos rather than Marylanders. While more than 70% of Marylanders want their leaders to fill the $2.9 billion in annual underfunding that public schools face, Gov. Hogan continues to ignore it while irresponsibly increasing his private school vouchers plan that overwhelmingly benefits students already in private schools."

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